Opinion Former Video

UK energy policy is constantly changing.

In 2016 alone, we saw an energy policy reset, Britons voting to leave the EU,
and the creation of a new Department putting energy policy right at the heart of the UK economy.

And in 2017 the Industrial Strategy and the Emissions Reduction Plan represent a huge opportunity for all government departments to work together to get energy policy right.

The UK Energy Research Centre has produced a review looking at five key areas we must get right to keep the lights on, costs down, and meet our carbon targets.

[Electricity] needs to be rapidly decarbonised if we’re to meet our carbon targets cost effectively.

We’ve made a good start - coal-fired power generation is in rapid decline and solar capacity has increased faster than predicted.

But network infrastructure, business models and public policies are struggling to keep pace.

Natural [gas] will continue to play a critical role in the UK’s energy mix. But we need gas to be a bridge to a low carbon future.

[Heat] for buildings comprises around 40 per cent of UK energy consumption and a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions.

That’s a huge sum. Government departments need to work together to reduce heat demand and improve energy efficiency.

[Transport] is one of the biggest sources of carbon emissions – but it’s the sector where we’ve seen the least progress.

We must start investing in the infrastructure needed to create the low-carbon transport system of the future.

[Public Attitudes] And last but not least, if we want the low carbon transition to succeed, we need to bring the public with us.

UKERC is calling on the Government to deliver on a series of key actions during this Parliament, to keep the lights on and costs down.

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