Week in review: Brexit, strikes, and Edwardian radicalism

"As we approach the end of the year, nobody really seems to be any clearer about the government's Brexit plan"
"As we approach the end of the year, nobody really seems to be any clearer about the government's Brexit plan"
Natalie Bloomer By

We kicked the week off by taking a look back to the 1906 election which broke the Tories. This piece examined the various political posters from around the time and suggested that while many were often quite crude, there was never any doubt as to where left candidates stood on the issues of the day. It suggested if today's left ever want to get back into power it should learn some lessons from the past.

The early twentieth century was also an important time for the struggle for workers' rights. While much has improved since then, this week's announcement of various strike action shows that disputes in the workplace can still have a big impact. This article argued that while industrial action can be frustrating for many, it's important that workers always have the right to take action over disputes.

As we approach the end of the year, nobody really seems to be any clearer about the government's Brexit plan. As ever, we've been following any developments and analysing government statements to keep you as informed as possible. This week we had a piece which decoded a remarkable session with David Davis in front of a Commons committee and suggested that the Tories know they are about to make us all poorer.


We also had a piece which asked if we could withdraw Article 50 once we trigger it. It concluded that we probably could, but as you might expect, it's complicated.

Still on Brexit, this article warned that we'd better hope that Liam Fox knows what he is doing or we could all be in serious trouble. And, with a recent poll suggesting that people in Sunderland would now vote to remain in the EU if there was another referendum, are the public getting cold feet?

A protest by Peter Tatchell during Jeremy Corbyn's speech last weekend caused plenty of headlines but this piece argued that all it really achieved was to detract from women's issues.

Finally, if you missed Philip Davies' contribution to the debate on the Istanbul Convention bill today, you would need to set aside at least 70 minutes to hear it. Labour MP Jess Phillips wrote for us ahead of the vote to warn that the bill is too important to allow Tories to talk it out.

Comments

Load in comments
Politics @ Lunch

Friday lunchtime. Your Inbox. It's a date.

Newsletter update